After a person has spent time searching for a special person to share their life with, it can feel great to find the right one. They can have an easy time imagining a future together. But, when it comes to spending habits, disagreements can get heated very quickly. To prevent these from ruining the lifestyle they are striving hard to build, here are tips for reducing financial stress in a relationship.

 

Recognize Money Beliefs Start in Childhood

 

Although partners live in the present, they both bring ideas and beliefs from the past. They have spending habits that stem from what got seen and heard throughout their childhood. To combat this, they can discuss family patterns and approaches to money. Also, they can pay attention to what occurred in the other person’s past and their own.

 

See How Emotion Gets Attached to Money

 

When a person spends money, their emotions and perceptions come along with their transactions. If they associate money with its role in protection and safety, their habits may revolve around saving, so they feel secure. When their money habits become linked to ideas about having fun, spending habits can revolve around the activities they enjoy most. To work better as a couple, they should discuss the emotions that come with spending and how it affects the relationship.

 

Have the Necessary Conversations About Money

 

As people spend time with each other, it can become evident that they aren’t on the same page about their views about life. They each have personal ideals on child-rearing, employment, marriage, and financial management. All the other areas may get addressed except finances because money can be a hard topic to tackle.

But, it needs to get done, and here are suggestions of topics they can begin with:

 

  • What are their thoughts on carrying credit card debt or any other debt?
  • How do they budget and prioritize the things they want to purchase?
  • Are they expecting to share a bank account, or are they doing a good job if already sharing a bank account?
  • What do they think is the best approach for retirement?

 

These conversations could flow smoothly, or a couple may run into obstacles that are hard to overcome. If necessary, they shouldn’t be afraid to reach out for help from a financial coach or relationship counselor. The goal is to find a way to work together.